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A Tale of Two Zinnia Skirts: Part 2

As promised, I am back with part two of my Zinnia skirt.  I had just joined my pockets and side seams together and given the material a good press with the iron.  In this post we are going to be talking all things zips, attaching a waistband, hemming and, last but no means least, button holes! Phew, what a list! Let’s get started!

Zips are my Achilles heel.  I have never put a zip in a garment without unpicking it at least 3 times and still not being happy with the end result.  The pattern asks for an invisible zip to be put in to the skirt, but I don’t own the proper foot to do this, so I have adjusted my pattern to suit a centered zipper.  If you aren’t familiar with different zipper insertions, see below for pictures of the different styles.

To sew the centered zipper, I first hand tacked it in place before using the zipper foot I do have to stitch it in place.  I used a seam ripper to unpick the middle stitches to expose the zipper.  I am thinking of doing a more in depth zipper tutorial at a later date!  I have to say that I am genuinely impressed with myself, as I didn’t need to unpick my zip at all. Yay! Perhaps practice does make perfect.

Zipper foot and stages of insertion
Zipper foot and stages of insertion

After a fairly pain free zip insertion it was time to attach the waist band.  I folded the material in half, right sides together and sewed the side seams.  I then trimmed the seam allowance and turned the waistband the right way out and pressed.
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Using the sewing machine, I attached half of the waistband to the front of the skirt.  With the unattached piece of waist band, I turned the seam up and pinned it to the inside the skirt.  This hides all the raw edges  of the garment.

The button hole is the last thing to do.  Firstly, measure the button you have chosen and add 1/8” of an inch to allow the button to fit comfortably through the button hole you will make.  Mark where you want the button hole to go, I use chalk as it is easy to rub off the garment.  You then need to use a special buttonhole foot and set your machine to the correct mode.  The majority of sewing machines have a buttonhole option, which will either be mechanical or automatic.  For those who have an automatic buttonhole option (lucky devils!) the machine does all the hard work for you.  Whereas the mechanical setting you need to adjust the machine for the four sides of the buttonhole.

Once you have your lovely buttonhole, put a pin in the top and the bottom of it.  Then use a seam ripper to open it up and then hand sew on your button to complete your Zinnia skirt.

Well, there we have it- skirt three of four completed for the one week, one pattern challenge.  I’m going to leave the big reveal of me wearing the skirt until next week.  But, until then I will leave you with Double D flaunting her stuff wearing her polka dot wonder!  Less than a week now until the beginning of the challenge, what will you be wearing?

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