A tale of two Zinnia Skirts: Part 1

It’s just over a week until the start of my one week one pattern challenge and I am currently chasing my tail, furiously sewing to get my garments finished in time.  Last time I blogged about this challenge, I was getting ready to high tail it over to Mandors and splash my cash on some new fabric.  Literally, the day after I posted this post, what landed in my inbox but an itison deal for Mandors.  £20 of my hard earned money for £40’s worth of sewing goodies! Sold!

Mandors Purchases
Mandors Purchases

I spent my voucher on some amazing polka dot cotton and a lovely tartan stretch fabric to complete my final two skirts.  So to celebrate my purchases, I thought I would show you how I made one of my Zinnia skirts.

First things first, the laying out and cutting of the pattern.  I find that the best place to do this in my flat is on the hall floor, as it is the only space big enough to accommodate the 2 metres of fabric needed.  The pattern requires a front piece, cut on the fold, two back pieces, a waistband and two pockets.  My tip cutting out the pockets is to trace two copies of the pocket pattern; it saves you fishing scraps pieces of material out the bin when you forget all about the second pocket.

Pleats
Pleats
Top Stitched Pleats
Top Stitched Pleats

After transferring all the markings, the next thing to do is to sew the pleats.  I tend to sew my pleats in place and then give them a good press towards, what will be, the side seams.  The best piece of advice I have been given is to always press your seams after you have sewn anything.  It gives a neater finish and makes the material easier to handle.  I then top stitched my pleats so they sit flat to the skirt.

Stitching pockets to the front piece
Stitching pockets to front of skirt

Once all the pleats have driven you mental, its then time to attach the front and the back of the skirt. Before sewing them together, I first stitched the pockets to pattern pieces onto the right side of the material. Press the pockets away from the main pieces of fabric and then pin the front and back pieces together.  I then used my overlocker machine to join my side seams together, taking my time going around the edges of the pockets.

Pinning front and back pieces together
Pinning front and back pieces together

 

Enjoying the polka dot over load so far? Me too. Can’t wait to get this skirt finished and to share it with you all.  Join me later on in the week where I’ll be talking zips and all things waistbands.  I might even have a finished garment to show you!

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